Nearly 350,000 2018 Ford Expedition, F-150 Trucks Recalled for Shifter Issue

Nearly 350,000 2018 Ford Expedition, F-150 Trucks Recalled for Shifter Issue

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Ford has issued two separate safety recalls that involve potential transmission problems. Affected vehicles include newer editions of the Ford Expedition, F-Series, Mustang, and Lincoln Navigator.

Nearly 350,000 2018 Ford Expedition, F-150 Trucks Recalled for Shifter Issue

Unseated gear shift cable clip (2018 Ford F-150, 2018 Ford Expedition, 2018 Ford F-650 and F-750)

The Problem: Normally, there is a clip that locks the gear shift cable to the transmission. But on certain Ford trucks and SUVs, this clip may not be fully seated. Over time, this problem can cause the transmission to be in a different position than the one selected by the driver. According to Ford, the driver may be able to move the shifter to the “Park” position and remove the ignition key although the transmission isn’t really in that gear. The vehicle will not give any warning messages indicating this issue. If the driver didn’t apply the parking brake before leaving, the vehicle could roll away. Ford says it knows of one reported accident and injury related to the problem.

The issue affects certain 2018 Ford F-150 and Expedition vehicles with 10-speed automatic transmissions, as well as 2018 F-650 and F-750 vehicles with six-speed automatic transmissions. Here is a more detailed breakdown of the affected vehicles:

-2018 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Dearborn Assembly Plant between January 5, 2017 and February 16, 2018

-2018 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Kansas City Assembly Plant between January 25, 2017 and February 16, 2018

-2018 Ford Expedition vehicles built at Kentucky Truck plant between April 3, 2017 and January 30, 2018

-2018 Ford F-650 and F-750 vehicles built at Ohio Assembly Plant between April 25, 2017 and March 9, 2018

The Fix: Drivers can take their vehicles to a Ford dealership that will inspect the shift cable locking clip. If dealers find that the clip is not in the proper position, they will adjust the shifter cable and secure the clip for free.

Number of Vehicles Potentially Affected: This Ford recall affects about 347,425 vehicles in North America, including 292,909 in the U.S. and its territories.

Nearly 350,000 2018 Ford Expedition, F-150 Trucks Recalled for Shifter Issue

Nearly 350,000 2018 Ford Expedition, F-150 Trucks Recalled for Shifter Issue

Missing transmission roll pin (2017-2018 Ford F-150, 2018 Ford Expedition, 2018 Lincoln Navigator, 2018 Ford Mustang with 10R80 transmissions)

The Problem: This smaller recall is similar to the one listed above. These vehicles may be missing a roll pin that attaches the park pawl rod guide cup to the transmission case. In this situation, the transmission may eventually lose park function even when the shifter is physically in the “Park” position. Again, there will be no warning message displayed when the driver exits the vehicle and the vehicle is not secured. Rollaways could occur if the driver didn’t already apply the parking brake. Ford says it isn’t aware of any accidents or injuries related to this recall.

Here is a detailed list of the vehicles under this recall:

-2017-18 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Dearborn Assembly Plant between October 20, 2016 and March 5, 2018

-2017-18 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Kansas City Assembly Plant between December 22, 2017 and February 26, 2018

-2018 Ford Expedition vehicles built at Kentucky Truck Plant between November 28, 2017 and February 14, 2018

-2018 Ford Mustang vehicles built at Flat Rock Assembly Plant between November 6, 2017 and February 12, 2018

-2018 Lincoln Navigator vehicles built at Kentucky Truck Plant between December 13, 2017 and March 8, 2018

The Fix: Dealers will install the missing roll pin if required. Customers will not be charged for the service.

Number of Vehicles Potentially Affected: This recall only involves 161 vehicles in North America, including 142 in the U.S. and its territories.

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